The Goddess Pachamama

from the lovely sagegoddess

Pachamama is the Andean goddess of the Earth, fertility, agriculture, planting, and harvesting. She is the female embodiment of the Earth in ancient Incan mythology; she and her father were two important deities in Incan custom. She was said to be a dragon who lived at the base of a mountain, and she could cause earthquakes and facilitate change. She was also sometimes depicted as a woman made of corn.

With the European conquest, colonization, and forced conversion of South America,  Pachamama became to be heavily associated with The Virgin Mary, but recently, Pachamama is re-emerging in South American culture and modern lifestyles as her own entity. There are many shrines to her in South America located near rocky areas, and also near tree trunks. She is depicted in reverence as a woman bearing harvested crops. You may see her carrying corn, potatoes, or cocoa leaves. Her husband was Pacha Kamaq, and she had two children: the sun god Inti and the moon goddess Killa. Pachamama is the source of the main cosmological elements to the Quechua people. Water, Earth, sun, and moon are a part of her domain.

In ancient mythology, Pachamama’s legends portrayed her as an often vengeful goddess, pleased by ritual sacrifices. Today she is known and respected among Andean cultures as a compassionate, generous, female embodiment of the Earth. A belief remains that when humans are careless with the Earth and her resources, Pachamama can become angered, and cause problems and natural disasters, such as earthquakes. Her energy can help facilitate rapid change and transformation.

You can find a set of tools aligned to Pachamama’s energy here.

If you missed my previous Full Moon Goddess rituals, you can watch them on my YouTube channel.

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5 thoughts on “The Goddess Pachamama

  1. Reblogged this on Shamagaia and commented:
    Pacha Mama; A.K.A Gaia (ancient Greece) Sophia (Gnostic Christianity), Isis (Ancient Egypt) Tara (Tibetan Buddhism) to name just a few. I just like to call her big momma. Big momma is back, bigger and better than ever. Don’t forget to thank her for your daily nourishment and support!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: The Goddess Pachamama | ugiridharaprasad

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